16.1 C
Nairobi
Saturday, October 1, 2022

Connectedness with Nature and our Environment: Enhancing our Wellbeing

- Advertisement -spot_imgspot_img
- Advertisement -spot_imgspot_img

There are several ways of improving our lives, including our mental health. Unfortunately, most of these methods are not readily available to a majority of people, and this is partly due to lack of or inadequate health and mental services, as well as the absence of prerequisite information. Another reason is that they are simply unable to devote time to a few activities. Human energy is generated by four things: the food we eat that involves nutrients nourishes the body (physiologically); inner (intrinsic) motivation, including our thoughts and feelings (the mind, psychological and emotional wellness); the environment, including our relations with others (social and moral perspectives) that enhance our interactions (extrinsic motivation); and, the spiritual acumen (spiritual perspective).

The interrelatedness between the body, mind and environment is found in their connectedness. Connectedness refers to the way we relate to one another and with nature and this, in turn, becomes our life experience. On one hand, a strong, effective and appropriate connection with nature implies that we feel a close relationship with self, family and others. This is developed in several ways (physical, social, mental (psychological, emotional), religion (spiritualism), and intellectual) and leads to a greater attachment with self (high self-esteem, optimism), family (sense of belongingness) and other people (acceptability) and our natural surroundings. This enhances our well-being. On the other hand, an inappropriate and thus ineffective connection with self, family and others leads to low self-esteem, regret, pessimism and unacceptability that in turn lead to frustration and depression. This is developed in several ways, such as insecure home or community or abuse (physical or emotional abuse).

Various research demonstrates that people who are more connected with nature (self, family, community, and their natural environment) are usually more appreciative of life, more optimistic, and live happier in life. They in turn, are more appreciative of other people and more likely to report feeling their lives are worthwhile and talk positively about life in general. This is because nature can generate a multitude of positive emotions, such as calmness, joy and happiness, creativity, and innovation, and these facilitate greater concentration. Overall, the connectedness with nature is also associated with lower levels of poor mental health since the person is less frustrated and thus has lower depression and anxiety levels.

A major part of this connectedness is the need to live more fulfilling lives. Persons connected with nature are more likely to admire the natural environment and develop a good relationship, such as planting flowers and visiting natural places. This is because they connect with life every day. This brings about highly benefits in mental health. There are several ways we can improve our connectedness with nature. One of these is by enhancing our mood in several ways, especially in our link with nature. This includes effective interaction with family and friends, colleagues and other acquaintances. Nature has a very wide definition and includes the sheer warmth from the sun, a walk in the park, planting flowers, and keeping a pet. Even watching nature and animal documentaries have been proven to be good for our mental health. This is significant since it is possible to enhance the mental health of many people through the benefits of nature, and this can also be made available to nearly every one of us, no matter our status or where we live.

Over the course of our lives, we experience various life challenges, which if unchecked, can psychologically torment us, leading to mental health problems. Mental health problems adversely affect thinking, mood, and behaviour. Many factors contribute to mental health problems, including:

• Biological factors, such as genes or brain chemistry.

• Life experiences, such as trauma or abuse.

• Family history of mental health problems.

People who are more connected with nature (self, family, community and their natural environment) are usually more appreciative of life, more optimistic and live happier in life. They in turn, are more appreciative of other people and more likely to report feeling their lives are worthwhile and talk positively about life in general. This is because nature generates a multitude of positive emotions, such as calmness, joy and happiness, creativity and innovation, and these facilitate greater concentration. Overall, the connectedness with nature is also associated with lower levels of poor mental health since the person is less frustrated and thus has lower depression and anxiety levels.

- Advertisement -spot_imgspot_img
Dr. Geoffrey Wangohttps://counsel-lingmagazine.co.ke/
Many people often ask me about my personal stand, my passion in life and how I got into Counselling Psychology and why in particular the establishment and writing in their favourite publication, The Counsel-ling Magazine. Colleagues and students, participants in various seminars and others suggested that I should include some information that would assist clients, practitioners and students to perhaps establish a career, or even assess and evaluate their ethical, moral and professional standards. Well, this allows for personal reflection and I feel it wise to include a few remarks about my fervour on counselling, mentoring and education as well as various aspects of life.
Latest news
- Advertisement -spot_img
Related news
- Advertisement -spot_img

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here